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    The inorganic phototropic growth of Se-Te thin films leads to nanostructures with unexpected morphologies. These structures grow towards light and respond to the polarization, wavelength, and angle of incident light by changing their shape. This sample was produced by photoelectrodepositing Se-Te on a p+ Si substrate to a charge density of 3000 mC/cm^2 under a NIR illumination source with a 927nm wavelength.
The inorganic phototropic growth of Se-Te thin films leads to nanostructures with unexpected morphologies. These structures grow towards light and respond to the polarization, wavelength, and angle of incident light by changing their shape. This sample was produced by photoelectrodepositing Se-Te on a p+ Si substrate to a charge density of 3000 mC/cm^2 under a NIR illumination source with a 927nm wavelength.

The inorganic phototropic growth of Se-Te thin films leads to nanostructures with unexpected morphologies. These structures grow towards light and respond to the polarization, wavelength, and angle of incident light by changing their shape. This sample was produced by photoelectrodepositing Se-Te on a p+ Si substrate to a charge density of 3000 mC/cm^2 under a NIR illumination source with a 927nm wavelength.
The inorganic phototropic growth of Se-Te thin films leads to nanostructures with unexpected morphologies. These structures grow towards light and respond to the polarization, wavelength, and angle of incident light by changing their shape. This sample was produced by photoelectrodepositing Se-Te on a p+ Si substrate to a charge density of 3000 mC/cm^2 under a NIR illumination source with a 927nm wavelength.

 

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Lorenzo Van Munoz
PMA

The two images I am submitting are examples of artistically interesting nanostructures fabricated during my SURF project. They are composed of selenium-tellurium alloy photo-electrodeposited onto a p+ Si electrode that spontaneously assembles into these structures when illuminated by single-wavelength unpolarized light. The growth mechanism of these structures is called inorganic phototropic growth because the way which these structures grow towards light and respond to it mimics that of living plants. The images were taken by a scanning electron microscope. The images are of the same sample, though one or the other should be chosen for display depending on the size of the poster it is printed on.

lxvm@caltech.edu

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