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    Time-lapse of waving Caenorhabditis elegans roundworms (No. 1). "One's heart points in a thousand directions, and each second those arrows can change." - old Buddhist saying
Time-lapse of waving Caenorhabditis elegans roundworms (No. 1). "One's heart points in a thousand directions, and each second those arrows can change." - old Buddhist saying

Time-lapse of waving Caenorhabditis elegans roundworms (No. 2). ("kimagure"): capriciousness of the heart
Time-lapse of waving Caenorhabditis elegans roundworms (No. 2). ("kimagure"): capriciousness of the heart

Time-lapse of waving Caenorhabditis elegans roundworms (No. 3).
Time-lapse of waving Caenorhabditis elegans roundworms (No. 3).

 

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James Lee
Graduate Student, BBE
Pei-Yin Shih
Graduate Student, BBE

Caenorhabditis elegans roundworms can respond to environmental stress by entering into a spore-like larval stage. These larvae acquire new behaviors that allow them to exploit larger animals as "taxis" to improved environments. In the Sternberg lab, we have taken time-lapse images of one such behavior where the roundworm stands on its tail and waves its body to try to attach onto passing animals.

These images capture a capriciousness, and a quiet sense of struggle, that seemed familiar to me. The images form a series titled “Kimagure,” a Japanese term that translates to “capriciousness of the heart.”

Images are 6.4" x 5".

jllee@caltech.edu

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